We don’t give other people credit for the same interior complexity we take for granted in ourselves, the same capacity for holding contradictory feelings in balance, for complexly alloyed affections, for bottomless generosity of heart and petty, capricious malice. We can’t believe that anyone could be unkind to us and still be genuinely fond of us, although we do it all the time.

I Know What You Think of Me, by Tim Krieder. (via timoni)

90% of the world’s problems go away if we all internalize this information and apply it uniformly to our daily lives.

(via mdt)

Just as we were all, potentially, in Adam when he fell, so we were all, potentially, in Jerusalem on that first Good Friday before there was an Easter, a Pentecost, a Christian, or a Church. It seems to me worth while asking ourselves who we should have been and what we should have been doing. None of us, I’m certain, will imagine himself as one of the Disciples, cowering in an agony of spiritual despair and physical terror. Very few of us are big wheels enough to see ourselves as Pilate, or good churchmen enough to see ourselves as a member of the Sanhedrin. In my most optimistic mood I see myself as a Hellenized Jew from Alexandria visiting an intellectual friend. We are walking along, engaged in philosophical argument. Our path takes us past the base of Golgotha. Looking up, we see an all-too-familiar sight — three crosses surrounded by a jeering crowd. Frowning with prim distaste, I say, “It’s disgusting the way the mob enjoy such things. Why can’t the authorities execute criminals humanely and in private by giving them hemlock to drink, as they did with Socrates?” Then, averting my eyes from the disagreeable spectacle, I resume our fascinating discussion about the nature of the True, the Good, and the Beautiful.

The Great Evangelical Divorce

briansgee:

Prologue:

A palpable shift within Evangelicalism has been happening over the last two weeks. Conservative and Progressive Evangelicals have been raising their war cries against one another. While each side is sure of where they stand, I’m convinced that neither side understands how they got to…

sarahneff:

It’s all grace, really.

It just takes on different names

in different seasons.

I came to realize that we don’t raise boys to be men, we raise them not to be women.

Don McPherson, former NFL quarterback, feminist, educator (via s-unyata)

WOAH.

(via ramblesanddreams)

(Source: spikyhairjon)